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Archive for 'culture'

new book – ‘The Anthropology of Intentions: Language in a World of Others’ by Alessandro Duranti

January 18, 2015

The Anthropology of Intentions

The Anthropology of Intentions: Language in a World of Others by Alessandro Duranti (Cambridge University Press, 2015)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

How and to what extent do people take into account the intentions of others? Alessandro Duranti sets out to answer this question, showing that the role of intentions in human interaction is variable across cultures and contexts. Through careful analysis of data collected over three decades in US and Pacific societies, Duranti demonstrates that, in some communities, social actors avoid intentional discourse, focusing on the consequences of actions rather than on their alleged original goals. In other cases, he argues, people do speculate about their own intentions or guess the intentions of others, including in some societies where it was previously assumed they avoid doing so. To account for such variation, Duranti proposes an ‘intentional continuum’, a concept that draws from phenomenology and the detailed analysis of face-to-face interaction. A combination of new essays and classic re-evaluations, the book draws together findings from anthropology, linguistics and philosophy to offer a penetrating account of the role of intentions in defining human action.

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new book – ‘The Intercultural Mind: Connecting Culture, Cognition, and Global Living’ by Joseph Shaules

January 12, 2015

The Intercultural Mind

The Intercultural Mind: Connecting Culture, Cognition, and Global Living by Joseph Shaules (Intercultural Press, 2015)

(amazon.co.uk)

Book description from the publisher:

In this pioneering book, Joseph Shaules explores exciting new research in cultural psychology and neuroscience, and explains how the new science of the mind can help us understand how the unconscious mind processes cultural differences, and how our sense of identity shapes how we view the world.

The Intercultural Mind presents new perspectives on important questions such as:

What is culture shock, and how does it affect us?
Why are we blind to our own cultural conditioning?
Can cultural differences be measured?
What does it mean to have an international mindset?

Illustrated with a wealth of examples and memorable stories, The Intercultural Mind is a fascinating look at how intercultural experiences can transform the geography of thinking.

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recent book – ‘Dancing to Learn: The Brain’s Cognition, Emotion, and Movement’ by Judith Lynne Hanna

December 26, 2014

Dancing to Learn

Dancing to Learn: The Brain’s Cognition, Emotion, and Movement by Judith Lynne Hanna (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

Dancing to Learn: Cognition, Emotion, and Movement explores the rationale for dance as a medium of learning to help engage educators and scientists to explore the underpinnings of dance, and dancers as well as members of the general public who are curious about new ways of comprehending dance. Among policy-makers, teachers, and parents, there is a heightened concern for successful pedagogical strategies. They want to know what can work with learners. This book approaches the subject of learning in, about, and through dance by triangulating knowledge from the arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and cognitive and neurological sciences to challenge dismissive views of the cognitive importance of the physical dance. Insights come from theories and research findings in aesthetics, anthropology, cognitive science, dance, education, feminist theory, linguistics, neuroscience, phenomenology, psychology, and sociology. Using a single theory puts blinders on to other ways of description and analysis. Of course, all knowledge is tentative. Experiments necessarily must focus on a narrow topic and often use a special demographic—university students, and we don’t know the representativeness of case studies.

Google Books preview:

See also: Author’s website

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out in paperback – ‘How Authors’ Minds Make Stories’ (& 1 more) by Patrick Colm Hogan

December 22, 2014

How Authors' Mind Make Stories

How Authors’ Minds Make Stories by Patrick Colm Hogan (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

This book explores how the creations of great authors result from the same operations as our everyday counterfactual and hypothetical imaginations, which cognitive scientists refer to as “simulations.” Drawing on detailed literary analyses as well as recent research in neuroscience and related fields, Patrick Colm Hogan develops a rigorous theory of the principles governing simulation that goes beyond any existing framework. He examines the functions and mechanisms of narrative imagination, with particular attention to the role of theory of mind, and relates this analysis to narrative universals. In the course of this theoretical discussion, Hogan explores works by Austen, Faulkner, Shakespeare, Racine, Brecht, Kafka, and Calvino. He pays particular attention to the principles and parameters defining an author’s narrative idiolect, examining the cognitive and emotional continuities that span an individual author’s body of work.

Google Books preview:

Another newly issued paperback by the same author:

What Literature Teaches Us About Emotions

What Literature Teaches Us about Emotion by Patrick Colm Hogan (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

Literature provides us with otherwise unavailable insights into the ways emotions are produced, experienced, and enacted in human social life. It is particularly valuable because it deepens our comprehension of the mutual relations between emotional response and ethical judgment. These are the central claims of Hogan’s study, which carefully examines a range of highly esteemed literary works in the context of current neurobiological, psychological, sociological, and other empirical research. In this work, he explains the value of literary study for a cognitive science of emotion and outlines the emotional organization of the human mind. He explores the emotions of romantic love, grief, mirth, guilt, shame, jealousy, attachment, compassion, and pity – in each case drawing on one work by Shakespeare and one or more works by writers from different historical periods or different cultural backgrounds, such as the eleventh-century Chinese poet Li Ch’ing-Chao and the contemporary Nigerian playwright Wole Soyinka.

Google Books preview:

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“Big Deal” on kindle – $2.99 for ‘What Makes Civilization?: The Ancient Near East & the Future of the West’

December 8, 2014

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