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Archive for 'psychology'

currently $3.79 kindle ebook deal: ‘The Honest Truth About Dishonesty’ by Dan Ariely

December 18, 2014

Comments (0) - psychology

$0.99 kindle ebook on Amazon: ‘How Schopenhauer Got Me Through My Mid-Life Crisis’ by Charles Alonso

December 17, 2014

Comments (0) - happiness,new books,psychology

new book – ‘Aha!: The Moments of Insight That Shape Our World’ by William B. Irvine

December 16, 2014

Aha!

Aha!: The Moments of Insight that Shape Our World by William B. Irvine (Oxford University Press, 2014)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

Great ideas often develop gradually after studying a problem at length–but not always. Sometimes, an insight hits like a bolt from the blue. For Archimedes, clarity struck while he was taking a bath. For Gustav Mahler, it came as the blades of his oars touched the water. And for Albert Einstein, it emerged while he was talking to a friend. Why do these moments of insight strike so suddenly? Why do they so often come to us when we are focused on something completely unrelated? And when great ideas “come to” us, where do they come from?

In Aha!: The Moments of Insight that Shape Our World, philosopher William B. Irvine, author of A Guide to the Good Life and On Desire, explores these epiphanies, from the minor insights that strike us all daily, to the major realizations that alter the course of history. Focusing on aha moments as they take place in five different domains–religion, morality, science, math, and art–Irvine provides case studies that shed light on the different ways epiphanies happen in the different domains, and on their differing social impact. Along the way, he describes some of the great aha moments in history, from ancient times to the present day.

We like to think that our greatest thoughts are the product of our conscious mind. Irvine demonstrates, though, that it is our unconscious mind that is the source of our most significant insights, and that the role the conscious mind plays in eliciting these insights is to try, unsuccessfully, to solve certain problems. Only if the conscious mind is willing to do this–and thereby experience considerable frustration–is the unconscious mind likely to reward it with a breakthrough insight-that the conscious mind will then take credit for.

Google Books preview:

See also: Author’s website

Comments (0) - new books,psychology

new book – ‘Feeling Smart: Why Our Emotions Are More Rational Than We Think’ by Eyal Winter

December 15, 2014

Feeling Smart

Feeling Smart: Why Our Emotions Are More Rational Than We Think by Eyal Winter (PublicAffairs, 2014)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

Which is smarter—your head or your gut? It’s a familiar refrain: you’re getting too emotional. Try and think rationally. But is it always good advice?

In this surprising book, Eyal Winter asks a simple question: why do we have emotions? If they lead to such bad decisions, why hasn’t evolution long since made emotions irrelevant? The answer is that, even though they may not behave in a purely logical manner, our emotions frequently lead us to better, safer, more optimal outcomes.

In fact, as Winter discovers, there is often logic in emotion, and emotion in logic. For instance, many mutually beneficial commitments—such as marriage, or being a member of a team—are only possible when underscored by emotion rather than deliberate thought. The difference between pleasurable music and bad noise is mathematically precise; yet it is also something we feel at an instinctive level. And even though people are usually overconfident—how can we all be above average?—we often benefit from our arrogance.

Feeling Smart brings together game theory, evolution, and behavioral science to produce a surprising and very persuasive defense of how we think, even when we don’t.

Comments (0) - cognitive science,new books,psychology

new book – ‘Great Myths of the Brain’ by Christian Jarrett

November 12, 2014

Great Myths of the Brain

Great Myths of the Brain by Christian Jarrett (Wiley Blackwell, 2014)

(kindle ed.), (amazon.co.uk), (UK kindle ed.)

Book description from the publisher:

Great Myths of the Brain introduces readers to the field of neuroscience by examining popular myths about the human brain. Explores commonly-held myths of the brain through the lens of scientific research, backing up claims with studies and other evidence from the literature Looks at enduring myths such as “Do we only use 10% of our brain?”, “Pregnant women lose their mind”, “Right-brained people are more creative” and many more. Delves into myths relating to specific brain disorders, including epilepsy, autism, dementia, and others Written engagingly and accessibly for students and lay readers alike, providing a unique introduction to the study of the brain Teaches readers how to spot neuro hype and neuro-nonsense claims in the media.

Google Books preview:

See also: Author’s website

Comments (0) - cognitive science,new books,psychology